You can now place requests for physical library materials on this website. Be advised that items recently returned to the library may continue to appear on your account for a few days. For the safety of library customers and staff, returned materials are quarantined for a minimum of 96 hours before they are checked in. Please contact your local library for hold pickup instructions, or to ask any questions about returned items.

Brick by brick

by Smith, Charles R., Jr., 1969-

Format: Print Book 2013
Availability: Available at 14 Libraries 15 of 16 copies
Available (15)
Location Collection Call #
Braddock Carnegie Library Picture Books P REAL SMI
Location  Braddock Carnegie Library
 
Collection  Picture Books
 
Call Number  P REAL SMI
 
 
CLP - East Liberty Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - East Liberty
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Homewood Children's African American qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Homewood
 
Collection  Children's African American
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Knoxville Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Knoxville
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Main Library First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Main Library First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - South Side Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - South Side
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Squirrel Hill Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Squirrel Hill
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - West End Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - West End
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
CLP - Woods Run Children's Non-Fiction Collection qj F204.W5 S66 2012
Location  CLP - Woods Run
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  qj F204.W5 S66 2012
 
 
Community Library of Allegheny Valley - Harrison Children Non Fiction J 975.3 SMITH
Location  Community Library of Allegheny Valley - Harrison
 
Collection  Children Non Fiction
 
Call Number  J 975.3 SMITH
 
 
Mt. Lebanon Public Library Children's Non-Fiction j 975.3 SMI
Location  Mt. Lebanon Public Library
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  j 975.3 SMI
 
 
Northland Public Library Children's Nonfiction J 975.3 SM5
Location  Northland Public Library
 
Collection  Children's Nonfiction
 
Call Number  J 975.3 SM5
 
 
Scott Township Library Juvenile Non-Fiction J 975.3 SMITH
Location  Scott Township Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  J 975.3 SMITH
 
 
Springdale Free Public Library
Location  Springdale Free Public Library
 
Collection 
 
Call Number 
 
 
 
Unavailable (1)
Location Collection Status
Plum Community Library Juvenile Non-Fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  Plum Community Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Status  CHECKED OUT
 
 
Summary

The compelling true story behind the building of the White House, a powerful part of history rarely taught. From Coretta Scott King Award winners Charles R. Smith Jr. and Floyd Cooper.

The home of the United States president was built by many hands, including those of slaves, who undertook this amazing achievement long before there were machines to do those same jobs.

Stirring and emotional, Floyd Cooper's stunning illustrations bring to life the faces of those who endured hard, brutal work when the profit of their labor was paid to the master, not the slave. The fact that many were able to purchase their freedom after earning money from learning a trade speaks to the strength of those individuals. They created this iconic emblem of America, brick by brick.

Includes an insightful author's note and a list of selected resources.

Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "In a closing author's note essential to a clear understanding of the story, Smith explains that when America was a new country and the president was in need of a residence, there were not enough workers. So the government sought slaves. Rented as property, / slave hands labor / as diggers of stone, / sawyers, / and bricklayers. At times, the rhymed verse sustains a cadence that echoes that of swinging axes; other times, the rhythm is a bit clunky, and the slant rhyme feels unintentional. Rising above these issues is Cooper's muted but powerful illustrations, which convey the enormity of the task as well as the strength, dignity, and pride with which the slaves approached their work. Despite being in chains, several of the enslaved workers appear to be singing. With each turn of the page, the slave hands gain new skills, which ultimately earn them money to buy their freedom. This is a story that deserves to be told, courtesy of a duo of Coretta Scott King Award winners.--Austin, Patricia Copyright 2010 Booklist"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Two Coretta Scott King Award winners pool their substantial talents in a somber tribute to the slave laborers who helped build the White House. Smith (Stars in the Shadows) emphasizes the toll that the work takes on the slaves' hands and bodies ("Slave hands swing axes/ twelve hours a day,/ but slave owners take/ slave hands' pay") and takes the time to give names to these "Nameless, faceless/ daughters and sons," forgotten by history. In gauzy scenes dominated by a sepia palette, Cooper (These Hands) spotlights the laborers' hands, but their faces-which project resilience, exhaustion, and even anger-have much to say, too. There's a slight upswing in tone as Smith notes that the skills the slaves acquired opened new possibilities ("Skilled hands earn/ one shilling per day,/ reaching slave hands closer/ to freedom with pay"), but there's little joy evident when the completed White House is unveiled. A grim reminder that in America's early decades, freedom didn't come cheap for many, and that our most venerated symbols, institutions, and forebears are not without flaws. Ages 5-8. Agent: Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects White House (Washington, D.C.) -- History -- 19th century -- Juvenile literature.
White House (Washington, D.C.) -- History -- 19th century.
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.) -- History -- 19th century -- Juvenile literature.
Slavery -- Washington (D.C.) -- History -- Juvenile literature.
African Americans.
Slavery.
Washington (D.C.) -- Buildings, structures, etc. -- Juvenile literature.
Washington (D.C.) -- Buildings, structures, etc.
Publisher New York :Amistad,2013
Edition 1st ed.
Contributors Cooper, Floyd.
Language English
Description 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
ISBN 9780061920820 (trade bdg.)
0061920827 (trade bdg.)
Other Classic View